Ludington Area Center for the Arts
Ludington Area Center for the Arts
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LACA to host artist receptions for August exhibits

The Ludington Area Center for the Arts (LACA), 107 S. Harrison St. in downtown Ludington is currently accepting reservations for its upcoming Friday, Aug. 7 artist receptions from 4-8 p.m.

The art center is again using a free reservation system as a means of staggering the number of people planning to attend the receptions in response to the Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s latest executive order which limits indoor gatherings.

The reservation system will allow for LACA staff and volunteers to manage the number of people in our facility, hopefully limiting the number of people we will have to ask to wait to enter the building. Reservation time-slots begin every 15-minutes and are 

LACA’s main gallery will features the work of Pentwater artists Paula DeGregorio and Frank Galante’s ‘Double Vision’ exhibit. DeGregorio and Galante’s exhibit features numerous landscape paintings in both oil and acrylic; pastels, drawings, collage and abstract “Smush” paintings. The couple has also been working on a series of pieces where featuring the same subject matter, only created in their own personal style.

The Ludington Area Center for the Arts (LACA) is excited to showcase the artwork of Pentwater artists Frank Galante and Paula DeGregorio during in August 2020. 
Galante and DeGregorio will exhibit an array of artwork in various mediums (paintings, both oil and acrylic; pastels; collage and abstract). They will also exhibit a handful of works featuring the same subject matter done in their own individual styles.
Galante is primarily self-taught as a painter. He was born and raised in New York City and was first introduced to the art of oil painting when he was a young child, watching his father paint. By the age of eight, the works and names of the likes of Cezanne, Modigliani and others were familiar to him--and though he was not yet painting, he was drawing. As a young teen, he often spent the weekends sketching at the American Museum of Natural History and browsing through the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Museum of Modern Art was another favorite haunt. 
This early immersion among the world’s masterpieces laid the foundation for a lifetime passion for the fine arts and their creation. Having had the foundations of technique laid with intensive mechanical and freehand classes in high school, he continued drawing throughout his life. Though he dabbled in painting, it wasn’t until middle age that he began to take it seriously. A few night classes at the Parsons School of Design and a landscape painting trip to Italy, and he was hooked. 
As a professional musician, Galante’s painting process—particularly in his abstract work—is heavily informed by the compositional and improvisational techniques that are an essential part of his musical life; consequently, as he sees it, painting is simply a visual expression of his music.
As a young child, DeGregorio was considered a coloring book master. No picture was too complicated to experiment with outlining, squiggles, shadows and plenty of blue. When old enough to travel
on my own, my time was spent in the Boston Museum whose rotunda was lined with Monet’s beautiful landscapes and coffee clubs that played experimental music.
Attending the University of Massachusetts as a BFA painting/sculpture major, the majority of my professors were ‘Abstract Expressionists’ who discouraged realism and technique and stressed emotions. Meanwhile, DeGregorio and several other students ran the Student Union Art Gallery which presented cutting edge NYC artists.
Moving to NYC after a stint in the Virgin Islands, DeGregorio's first job there was with a handbag designer.
She later received a second degree in Architectural Technology that allowed her to use her creative skills throughout her career.
Since moving to Michigan in 2010, DeGregorio has exhibited at Petri Gallery, Art on the Town, Ludington Area Art Center and many Pop Up exhibits. 
DeGregorio is currently painting landscapes, waterscapes and still lifes in oils and watercolor and creating still life collages. 
Many of DeGregorio's paintings are in private collections.
Besides painting, DeGregorio's time this past two years has been spent designing, project managing and now landscaping a neo mid-century modern home fill with art from around the world.

On display in LACA’s performance hall gallery will be Cheryl Gould and Linda Sandow’s ‘Two Artists from Vicksberg’ exhibit.LACA’s performance hall gallery will be Cheryl Gould and Linda Sandow’s ‘Two Artists from Vicksberg’ exhibit.

Sandow and Gould met in 1979 and ultimately taught in the same building, Vicksburg Middle School, with Sandow in English and Gould in art. Neither resides in the Kalamazoo area anymore, but their love of art binds their friendship.

Wildflowers and watercolors have always fascinated Gould, so when it came time to retire those two interests naturally melded. She and her husband and moved North to Mecosta County where he can hunt for turkeys and deer and I can hunt for wildflowers. I love to hike and bike through the woods to see what is blooming. I was fortunate to be able to participate in a workshop with Nita Engle before she retired. Her techniques enabled me to begin to tackle painting the complexity and depth of nature. Native wildflowers and their habitat became my primary subject matter, as I want to share my discoveries in the woods with those that might not otherwise see, or appreciate, them.

Gould enjoyed a thirty-year career as art instructor, especially the energy and growing sophistication of the middle school students. 

Sandow, a Ludington resident, is a retired teacher, writer and self-taught artist. She volunteers and teaches at LACA where she is a member of the Ludington Writers and the center’s art critique group as well as a regular performer at LACA’s Open Mic nights. 

Her favorite medium is acrylic with recent work done with palette knives.  The cover of her historical novel, Jacob Castle and Gliding Swan: The Story of a Mennonite Man and Shawnee Woman, is an acrylic painting of her brother Phillip as Jacob and sister Phyllis as Gliding Swan. Events of the book are based on her maternal family’s history during the 1700’s.

Mason County area artist John Marek will display artwork in the center’s Unframed Gallery. Marek’s exhibit ‘People, Places and Things features drawings of everyday subjects that have caught the eye of the artist.

The artist receptions for these exhibits will take place Friday, Aug. 7 from 4-8 p.m. and will have a slightly different feel than past artist receptions at LACA, according to LACA Executive Director Andrew Skinner.

“Due to the limitations on indoor gatherings the center has decided to take reservations for our artist receptions for foreseeable future. The reservation system will allow for LACA staff and volunteers to manage the number of people in our facility, hopefully limiting the number of people we will have to ask to wait to enter the building. Reservation time-slots begin every 15-minutes and are valid for 30 minutes. The free reservations can be made by visiting the art center’s online store at https://LACA is requiring Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) such as a face covering or mask to enter its facility. Those who do not have a mask with them will have the option to purchase a locally made mask in the LACA gift shop for just $4. “We are asking our guests to please be respectful to others and to socially distance themselves while viewing the exhibit,” Skinner added.

“We are also trying out a color-coded bracelet system that will allow our guests to communicate with others their comfort level with socializing while attending the event,” Skinner said. Upon entering guests will be able to choose either a red (I’m keeping my distance), yellow (I’m okay with talking but not touching) or green (I’m okay with hugs and high-fives). “This is an idea that our Office Manager, Kali Findley, and I both saw online and though it would be an interesting way to let others know your comfort level.

“We are also trying out a color-coded bracelet system that will allow our guests to communicate with others their comfort level with socializing while attending the event,” Skinner said. Upon entering guests will be able to choose either a red (I’m keeping my distance), yellow (I’m okay with talking but not touching) or green (I’m okay with hugs and high-fives). “This is an idea that our Office Manager, Kali Findley, and I both saw online and though it would be an interesting way to let others know your comfort level.

Skinner also noted that refreshments at the receptions would be limited to bottled water and that it would be available in the art center’s courtyard where a few tables will be set up for socializing.

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